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Honorary doctorate for Chancellor Angela Merkel: “Europe is each and every one of us”

Honorary doctorate for Chancellor Angela Merkel: “Europe is each and every one of us”

12 January 2017 - “At the university, you will not only get to know Europe, but also shape it: with your curiosity, dedication and drive, and by exchanging ideas.” With a warm appeal to the current generation of students, German Chancellor Angela Merkel received a joint honorary doctorate from KU Leuven and Ghent University.

Honorary doctorate for Chancellor Angela Merkel: “Europe is each and every one of us” - Read More…

Does Tinder lead to more casual sex?

Does Tinder lead to more casual sex?

6 January 2017 - Do people have more casual sex because of Tinder? Doctoral student Elisabeth Timmermans set out to find the answer: “One in two users already met one of their Tinder matches in real life. In a third of these cases, this led to sex.”

Does Tinder lead to more casual sex? - Read More…

Most Popular Stories of 2016

Most Popular Stories of 2016

22 December 2016 - Scientific breakthroughs, exciting events, and a little bit of folly: that is 2016 in a nutshell. To celebrate another wonderful year at KU Leuven, we compiled a list of the most popular stories published in 2016. Discover them in this interactive image or scroll down for this year's top 10. Happy News Year!

Most Popular Stories of 2016 - Read More…

“A slice of lemon in my drink? No thanks!”

“A slice of lemon in my drink? No thanks!”

22 December 2016 - Toxicologist and pharmacologist Jan Tytgat examines the harmful effects of various substances on human beings, food, and the environment. And he takes this knowledge with him when he enters a bar or a restaurant. “I’ll never make a scene about it, but I always frown if I get a drink with a slice of lemon in it.”

“A slice of lemon in my drink? No thanks!” - Read More…

Treating breast cancer before it spreads: study reveals longer potential treatment window

Treating breast cancer before it spreads: study reveals longer potential treatment window

20 December 2016 - Breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body relatively late, new research shows. This leaves more time than expected to treat the cancer before it spreads. These late-to-spread cells are also genetically similar to the cells of the diagnosed tumour in the breast, which may help choose the most effective treatment.

Treating breast cancer before it spreads: study reveals longer potential treatment window - Read More…

Patron Saint's Day 2017: KU Leuven to award four honorary doctorates 

19 December 2016 - As part of its Patron Saint’s Day celebrations, KU Leuven traditionally confers a number of honorary doctorates in recognition of extraordinary scientific, social, or cultural achievements. On 15 February 2017, the university will award honorary doctorates to five people who excel in their domain.

Patron Saint's Day 2017: KU Leuven to award four honorary doctorates  - Read More…

KU Leuven and UGent to confer joint honorary doctorate on Angela Merkel

On Thursday 12 January 2017 Rector Rik Torfs (KU Leuven) and Rector Anne De Paepe (UGent) will confer a joint honorary doctorate on German Chancellor Dr Angela Merkel. She will receive the honorary doctorate for her diplomatic and political efforts to develop the political strength of Europe, and to defend the values that allow our continent to find unity in diversity.

KU Leuven and UGent to confer joint honorary doctorate on Angela Merkel - Read More…

Pregnancy after obesity surgery requires more follow-up

Pregnancy after obesity surgery requires more follow-up

14 December 2016 - Women who get pregnant after obesity surgery often have nutritional deficiencies. They’re also more anxious than obese mothers-to-be who didn’t have surgery. KU Leuven researcher and midwife Goele Jans calls for a better follow-up of these women during their pregnancy.

Pregnancy after obesity surgery requires more follow-up - Read More…

Mysterious ‘crater’ on Antarctica is indication of vulnerable ice sheet

Mysterious ‘crater’ on Antarctica is indication of vulnerable ice sheet

12 December 2016 - The East Antarctic ice sheet appears to be more vulnerable than expected, due to a strong wind that brings warm air and blows away the snow. That is the conclusion reached by a team of climate researchers led by Jan Lenaerts (Utrecht University/KU Leuven) and Stef Lhermitte (TU Delft/KU Leuven), based on a combination of climate models, satellite observations and on-site measurements. “Tens of meters of rising sea levels are locked away in Antarctica”, says Lenaerts. “And our research has shown that also East Antarctica is vulnerable to climate change.”

Mysterious ‘crater’ on Antarctica is indication of vulnerable ice sheet - Read More…

Aggressive form of leukaemia linked to defective 'protein factory'

Aggressive form of leukaemia linked to defective 'protein factory'

9 December 2016 - Twenty to forty percent of the patients with the type of leukaemia known as multiple myeloma have a defect in the 'protein factory' of the cell: the ribosome. These patients have a poorer prognosis than patients with intact ribosomes. At the same time, they respond better to a drug that already exists. These are the findings of a study by the KU Leuven Laboratory for Disease Mechanisms in Cancer, led by Professor Kim De Keersmaecker.

Aggressive form of leukaemia linked to defective 'protein factory' - Read More…

Will Earth still exist 5 billion years from now? Old star offers sneak preview of the future

Will Earth still exist 5 billion years from now? Old star offers sneak preview of the future

8 December 2016 - What will happen to Earth when, in a few billion years’ time, the Sun is a hundred times bigger than it is today? Using the most powerful radio telescope in the world, an international team of astronomers has set out to look for answers in the star L2 Puppis. Five billion years ago, this star was very similar to the Sun as it is today.

Will Earth still exist 5 billion years from now? Old star offers sneak preview of the future - Read More…

A change of heart: epigenetic basis of cardiac hypertrophy uncovered

A change of heart: epigenetic basis of cardiac hypertrophy uncovered

Researchers at the Babraham Institute, KU Leuven, the University of Oslo and the Karolinska Institute have uncovered the molecular control mechanisms responsible for the different biological changes seen in cardiac hypertrophy induced by pathology compared to exercise. These findings point the way for the design of new treatments for heart disease.

A change of heart: epigenetic basis of cardiac hypertrophy uncovered - Read More…

In the picture: utopian Night at the Museum

In the picture: utopian Night at the Museum

24 November 2016 - Thomas More and his Utopia have cast a powerful spell on Leuven. This year’s Night at the Museum, too, was dedicated to the world-renowned book that More published in Leuven 500 years ago.

In the picture: utopian Night at the Museum - Read More…

Restoring flawed tumour vessels may improve cancer treatments

Restoring flawed tumour vessels may improve cancer treatments

21 November 2016 - Researchers led by Peter Carmeliet (KU Leuven-VIB) have found a novel way to normalize the dysfunctional blood vessels that are typical of tumours. These vessels play a pivotal role in cancer metastasis, as their fragility and permeability allows cancer cells to escape through the blood stream and invade other organs.

Restoring flawed tumour vessels may improve cancer treatments - Read More…

Investing in professional nurses still pays off in hospitals

Investing in professional nurses still pays off in hospitals

17 November 2016 - Higher mortality rates, more complications after routine surgery, and lower patient satisfaction. These are the consequences when hospitals replace professionally qualified nurses with lower skilled caregivers. An international team of researchers highlights the risks of this practice, which is increasingly common in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Investing in professional nurses still pays off in hospitals - Read More…

Education experts visit KU Leuven to assess quality assurance system

Education experts visit KU Leuven to assess quality assurance system

16 November 2016 - Does KU Leuven properly ensure the quality of its education? The university welcomes five experts this week who set out to answer this question. Their first site visit is part of the institutional review that replaces the previous system of programme-specific peer reviews.

Education experts visit KU Leuven to assess quality assurance system - Read More…

Livestock farming 2.0: more profits and animal welfare with smart technology

Livestock farming 2.0: more profits and animal welfare with smart technology

15 November 2016 - Detecting sick pigs, measuring the food intake of chicken, or discovering udder infections and leg injuries before it is too late? It’s all possible with Precision Livestock Farming (PLF). “This technology reduces the need for antibiotics, decreases the number of animals with growth retardation, and gives pig farmers the chance to attend the occasional barbecue.”

Livestock farming 2.0: more profits and animal welfare with smart technology - Read More…

Cactuses mark the start of this year's Love Leuven campaign

9 November 2016 - With the slogan ‘Got enough spine(s) to stand up for the climate?’, Vice Rector for Student Affairs Rik Gosselink and Leuven alderman Bieke Verlinden handed out one thousand little cactuses to citizens of Leuven and to students willing to contribute to a more sustainable world. The event marked the start of the third edition of Love Leuven, a campaign on the initiative of the city of Leuven, KU Leuven, and UC Leuven-Limburg. With a series of events, the partners aim to bring students and citizens of Leuven closer together. This year’s theme is sustainability.

Cactuses mark the start of this year's Love Leuven campaign - Read More…

Study reveals how Alzheimer’s spreads in the brain

Study reveals how Alzheimer’s spreads in the brain

9 November 2016 – Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s progress as toxic proteins spread throughout the brain. Synapses, which our brain cells use to communicate, play a pivotal role in this process. That is the conclusion of a study led by Professor Patrik Verstreken (VIB/KU Leuven). The new insights into the spreading mechanism could contribute to the development of treatments to slow down this process.

Study reveals how Alzheimer’s spreads in the brain - Read More…